The Cardinal Family

The Cardinal Family

Dove fledgling

Baby dove from a while back. He couldn’t fly and his mother fed him.

Blue Jay Fledgling

Older picture from 2019. Thought it would be good to share. The bird looks to be newly fledged. There are a few blue feathers starting to grow. It was under a big Oak tree

Blue Jay fledgling

Blue Jay fledgling

FEED ME!

Mockingbird fledgling yelling at its mother to feed it.

Mr. and Mrs. Blue Jay

Mr. and Mrs. Blue Jay visit our feeder. Mr. Blue Jay gave Mrs. Blue Jay a seed. The female was seen in a tree with her fledgling yesterday.

Baby Mourning Dove with hair.

This baby mourning dove has hair.

Mourning Dove Fledgling

This Mourning Dove fledgling was being chased and pecked by a male Mourning Dove. Then finally it got the seeds.

House Sparrow Fledgling

This female House was opening her yellow beak very wide and licking the top of her mouth. She was also blinking a lot. She looked newly fledged and smaller than the other House Sparrow fledglings that visit our feeder. She was on our fence and wasn’t eating seeds.

House Sparrow Fledglings

house sparrows

Bluebird Fledgling Feeding Nestlings

Fledgling Eastern Bluebird is bringing a mealworm to the nest box to feed the nestlings while the adult male is also feeding the nestlings.

First visit of Bluebirds after fledging

This was my first look at one of the young since I stopped nest box checks a week before fledging. We are first-time Bluebird landlords, and put a lot of thought and effort into giving Bluebirds a chance. One week after the brood of 4 fledged, the parents returned with a couple of the intrepid youngsters.

Window to the World

Baby Bluebird gets a few moments of encouragement from Papa Blue, minutes before he takes his first flight into the world.

Baby Bluebird Fledges the Nest! First Flight!

Two little House Finch babies poking their heads out of the nest almost ready to fledge.

Two little House Finch babies poking their heads out of the nest almost ready to fledge. (And they fledged successfully!)

Eastern Bluebirds Fledging

1st fledgling

on potted fig tree

A Chip off the Old Block

The Carolina wren on the right was banded by Cornell’s NestWatch program in 2016 (band #2741-54604). Although sex was indeterminate at the time of banding, his nonstop singing and territorial guarding of his turf soon indicated he was a male. He is a daily visitor to our feeders. We call him Randy. On the day this photo was taken, Randy’s latest brood had just fledged from a nest located in our potting shed which, try as we might, we were never able to locate. We did, however, witness Randy and his mate entering the shed through a gap in the roof with food offerings (including peanut splits!) over a period of about 2 weeks.

House Wrens

We had a House Wren nest in our garage, there were a lot of fledglings.

Violet-green Swallow fledgling.

Violet-green Swallow baby within hours of fledging.

Fledgling Mourning Dove

A Mourning Dove pair built a nest in a old robin nest which successfully fledged 3 baby robins. The doves raised two babies. Both of them fledged successfully that night before or that morning. (photo taken before sunrise) Both doves were there but one was scared off. Shortly after taking the photo, the other dove flew off too.

Chickadee Family

This looks like a Chickadee family but I’m not sure. Definitely a fledgling and 2 adults but the one above looks like a Chestnut-backed and the adult below looks like a Black-capped, the baby looks a bit more like a Chestnut-backed too. Do they cross breed?

Nearly There!

This is the first time I’ve seen any of the babies so far out of the nest cup I could get a picture. A few dozen attempts and I finally got this amazing picture! This is 1 of 3 babies on day 11-12. I think at least 2 of them fledge tomorrow, #3 hatched a full day later.

Taking Turns

I first noticed this pair of Mourning Dove fledglings hiding in my garden, waiting for mom to come back with food. She was feeding them millet from under my feeders.

The cutest babies in Colorado

Baby birds have been abundant in Adams County Colorado, including Burrowing Owlets and Yellow Warbler fledglings. The Yellow Warbler baby was photographed at Barr Lake State Park, and the Burrowing Owls were photographed in Prairie Dog towns in Adams County.

First flight

Carolina Chickadee’s

Papa Blue at Work

Gonna Fly Soon!

Robin Fledgling Fully Graduated

I am very pleased to announce that all four fledglings from the brood I monitored have fully “graduated” into young adulthood and are making a few appearances nearby. Nice to see this one in the woods. This one was the littlest fledgling, the one I was most worried about, but it seems to be very robust and doing well this evening. The parents were in the vicinity, yet quite distant. The fledgling flew very well from tree to tree, amazing me with how grown-up it is. I watched it groom/preen/scratch its wings and catch a bug for supper.

My, how robins develop so fast!

How did I know this was a fledgling from the brood I watched? It was the adult male watching her nearby. His markings were very tell-tale. Also this fledgling had the most white fluff and puffy breast compared to its siblings while in the nest. I would not have noticed the fledgling was there had I not stopped to photograph a garter snake on the ground closest to the tree where the father robin, nicknamed Serenade, was perched.

Midsummer’s Eve Fledglings

The robin fledglings I’ve monitored since the tail end of May are stretching their wings. The first to leave the nest was on June 19th 2014. I feared the fledglings would fall out of the nest and hit their heads on concrete sidewalk below, but they soon showed me “no worries” as they have taken to flight very quickly. The second to leave the nest is pictured perched on a cedar tree branch. I believe it was spooked out of the nest too soon, something that was unavoidable due to the very close proximity of the nest next to human dwelling — the nest was built upon an a/c unit barely 5 feet above ground level over a sidewalk frequently filled with human and canine traffic.

Great efforts to maintain the peace and quiet in the area of the nest has been trying on my neighbors, especially now as the fledglings are testing the air and everyone is anxious to see them take flight. So far we have excellent weather, no need for major use of the a/c unit, but come July that story may change. This Robin family has lucked out!

The 2nd fledgling to leave the nest is being taken care of while she stays in the cedar tree by the parent birds. I’ve seen her hop-fly upwards in little bursts of energy.

The last 2 fledglings are quite content to stay hidden in the nest. Now without their siblings, and being the littlest, they are left to develop at their own pace in a nest no longer over crowded with two fledglings far bigger than themselves.

These will be the last photographs I will take of this nest in order for the next 2 to stay in the nest until they are ready to really stretch their wings.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Cornell Lab of Ornithology