Two Anna’s Hummingbird Fledglings ready set…

I got the two fully feathered and looking fully grown, not able to fit in the nest anymore, perched on the rim of the nest. Minutes later one flew around the yard and landed on the distant feeder, so I got a close up of it, only to miss it taking off! One left in nest now and Mom came and tidied up the nest ? Mon I still feeding the one left!

Sacajawea Audubon Bluebird Trail

These photos are from our bluebird trail of 100+ nest boxes, NW of Bozeman, MT. This trail was started in the early 1970s and is monitored by chapter volunteers. NOTE: We have Federal and State permits to band and handle cavity nesting species.

Hard working dad

These 2 fledged 3 weeks ago. Momma’s fate is unknown as she vanished after laying 2 eggs of a 3rd brood, the nest box found open. I suspect a predator got her. This makes watching these parenting moments all the more touching. I’m thankful for the 2 successful broods this year.

Young Birds at my Feeders

I’ve been seeing a lot of juvenile and immature Northern Cardinals lately, and now there’s also a juvenile Red-Bellied Woodpecker! How exciting!!!

First Brood Bluebird Fledglings

Robin Nest

Time to Fly Little One!

While it may seem that this House Wren was feeding this nestling, it actually was tempting it to join its brothers and sisters who had already fledged. The parent snatched that food out of the nestlings mouth as quickly as it went in. It took a while but the temping finally worked!!

Northern Mockingbirds

Northern Mockingbird fledglings, ready to leave nest.

House Finch Fledglings

Georgia Bluebirds 2017.1

Early bluebirds in the birdhouse out front. Started building their nest in Feb and these fledged by April1

Feeding the kids

I was lucky enough to have a pair of eastern bluebirds nest in one of my boxes this spring, where they laid 6 eggs and fledged 5 young. Several weeks after the young fledged, the male brought two of the youngsters back to our garden to feed them mealworms, which is when I snapped this photo. It was sheer magic watching them and I stayed outside, quietly snapping away for 30 minutes until they left.

Our first bluebird nest

An Eastern Bluebird pair arrived on March 2, 2016. The selected our Gilbertson Nest Box and laid 5 eggs starting on April 2. The babies fledged on May 23. What a thrilling experience!

Carolina Wrens

2 Carolina wrens very close to fledging

“Invasion of the Starling Fledglings”

This spring we had about 12 Starling fledglings (pretty sure from more than one brood). They made a lot of noise and the parents were constantly busy.

Robin Fledgling Fully Graduated

I am very pleased to announce that all four fledglings from the brood I monitored have fully “graduated” into young adulthood and are making a few appearances nearby. Nice to see this one in the woods. This one was the littlest fledgling, the one I was most worried about, but it seems to be very robust and doing well this evening. The parents were in the vicinity, yet quite distant. The fledgling flew very well from tree to tree, amazing me with how grown-up it is. I watched it groom/preen/scratch its wings and catch a bug for supper.

My, how robins develop so fast!

How did I know this was a fledgling from the brood I watched? It was the adult male watching her nearby. His markings were very tell-tale. Also this fledgling had the most white fluff and puffy breast compared to its siblings while in the nest. I would not have noticed the fledgling was there had I not stopped to photograph a garter snake on the ground closest to the tree where the father robin, nicknamed Serenade, was perched.

Midsummer’s Eve Fledglings

The robin fledglings I’ve monitored since the tail end of May are stretching their wings. The first to leave the nest was on June 19th 2014. I feared the fledglings would fall out of the nest and hit their heads on concrete sidewalk below, but they soon showed me “no worries” as they have taken to flight very quickly. The second to leave the nest is pictured perched on a cedar tree branch. I believe it was spooked out of the nest too soon, something that was unavoidable due to the very close proximity of the nest next to human dwelling — the nest was built upon an a/c unit barely 5 feet above ground level over a sidewalk frequently filled with human and canine traffic.

Great efforts to maintain the peace and quiet in the area of the nest has been trying on my neighbors, especially now as the fledglings are testing the air and everyone is anxious to see them take flight. So far we have excellent weather, no need for major use of the a/c unit, but come July that story may change. This Robin family has lucked out!

The 2nd fledgling to leave the nest is being taken care of while she stays in the cedar tree by the parent birds. I’ve seen her hop-fly upwards in little bursts of energy.

The last 2 fledglings are quite content to stay hidden in the nest. Now without their siblings, and being the littlest, they are left to develop at their own pace in a nest no longer over crowded with two fledglings far bigger than themselves.

These will be the last photographs I will take of this nest in order for the next 2 to stay in the nest until they are ready to really stretch their wings.

Crowded Robin’s Nest

My Robin neighbors’ young are quickly developing feathers. Last week they still looked like the baby from the movie “Eraserhead” but now they resemble their parents, showing more personality, curiosity, and ever more verve. It must be itchy to grow into your feathers because they are constantly picking at themselves and each other (either that or they have mites — ouch). Mom (nicknamed “Serene”) and Dad (“Serenade”) show signs of weariness as they continue to strive to meet the demands of this maturing brood.

The biggest, and perhaps the first hatched, is on the far left. I have predicted it is a “he” because each time he has stretched out his neck, he displays the brightest breast and wing feathers. He will most likely jump out of the nest first. I also thought he would be the greediest when it came to food, but from what I’ve observed, the parents go back and forth dividing food in turns. They really pay attention to details.

Growing Robin Family

The female robin I’ve been monitoring, nicknamed Serene, now has a full brood, and, boy, are they HUNGRY! I am delighted to present such a lovely series of photographs which, without the trusting presence of the birds, and a nice zoom lens, would not otherwise enable me to show off this growing family.

The little ones are quickly growing their feathers. Today is the first day I’ve dared to peek at them since I noticed they hatched. To see that one of them has a tiny foot with the beginnings of “fingernails” (talons, heh!) made my day. Before I know it, they will fly away. I am anxious to report someday that this nesting attempt will be successful.

My whole neighborhood is excited about these birds!

WHAT IS IT?

WHAT IS IT? It was going to grackles (several times) a mockingbird and a blue jay trying get someone to feed it, no-one would 🙁 it makes sort of a ack-ack sound

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Cornell Lab of Ornithology