Hatchlings

They Fledged!

All of the baby robins have fledged now! ūüėÄ

American Robin River Trail Nest

American Robin nest in the crook of a tree along a bike trail next to a river. Full clutch of 3 eggs.

Three down, one to go!

The eggs in the nest in our carport hatched! The babies are so cute!

Robin Fledgling Fully Graduated

I am very pleased to announce that all four fledglings from the brood I monitored have fully “graduated” into young adulthood and are making a few appearances nearby. Nice to see this one in the woods. This one was the littlest fledgling, the one I was most worried about, but it seems to be very robust and doing well this evening. The parents were in the vicinity, yet quite distant. The fledgling flew very well from tree to tree, amazing me with how grown-up it is. I watched it groom/preen/scratch its wings and catch a bug for supper.

My, how robins develop so fast!

How did I know this was a fledgling from the brood I watched? It was the adult male watching her nearby. His markings were very tell-tale. Also this fledgling had the most white fluff and puffy breast compared to its siblings while in the nest. I would not have noticed the fledgling was there had I not stopped to photograph a garter snake on the ground closest to the tree where the father robin, nicknamed Serenade, was perched.

Midsummer’s Eve Fledglings

The robin fledglings I’ve monitored since the tail end of May are stretching their wings. The first to leave the nest was on June 19th 2014. I feared the fledglings would fall out of the nest and hit their heads on concrete sidewalk below, but they soon showed me “no worries” as they have taken to flight very quickly. The second to leave the nest is pictured perched on a cedar tree branch. I believe it was spooked out of the nest too soon, something that was unavoidable due to the very close proximity of the nest next to human dwelling — the nest was built upon an a/c unit barely 5 feet above ground level over a sidewalk frequently filled with human and canine traffic.

Great efforts to maintain the peace and quiet in the area of the nest has been trying on my neighbors, especially now as the fledglings are testing the air and everyone is anxious to see them take flight. So far we have excellent weather, no need for major use of the a/c unit, but come July that story may change. This Robin family has lucked out!

The 2nd fledgling to leave the nest is being taken care of while she stays in the cedar tree by the parent birds. I’ve seen her hop-fly upwards in little bursts of energy.

The last 2 fledglings are quite content to stay hidden in the nest. Now without their siblings, and being the littlest, they are left to develop at their own pace in a nest no longer over crowded with two fledglings far bigger than themselves.

These will be the last photographs I will take of this nest in order for the next 2 to stay in the nest until they are ready to really stretch their wings.

Crowded Robin’s Nest

My Robin neighbors’ young are quickly developing feathers. Last week they still looked like the baby from the movie “Eraserhead” but now they resemble their parents, showing more personality, curiosity, and ever more verve. It must be itchy to grow into your feathers because they are constantly picking at themselves and each other (either that or they have mites — ouch). Mom (nicknamed “Serene”) and Dad (“Serenade”) show signs of weariness as they continue to strive to meet the demands of this maturing brood.

The biggest, and perhaps the first hatched, is on the far left. I have predicted it is a “he” because each time he has stretched out his neck, he displays the brightest breast and wing feathers. He will most likely jump out of the nest first. I also thought he would be the greediest when it came to food, but from what I’ve observed, the parents go back and forth dividing food in turns. They really pay attention to details.

Growing Robin Family

The female robin I’ve been monitoring, nicknamed Serene, now has a full brood, and, boy, are they HUNGRY! I am delighted to present such a lovely series of photographs which, without the trusting presence of the birds, and a nice zoom lens, would not otherwise enable me to show off this growing family.

The little ones are quickly growing their feathers. Today is the first day I’ve dared to peek at them since I noticed they hatched. To see that one of them has a tiny foot with the beginnings of “fingernails” (talons, heh!) made my day. Before I know it, they will fly away. I am anxious to report someday that this nesting attempt will be successful.

My whole neighborhood is excited about these birds!

Another Robin Mother!

This is Other Mother, another robin mother who has nested on an a/c unit in my apartment complex facing Schmeeckle Reserve (my backyard). She does not trust me at all! So I am careful to not to alarm her again. Here she is eyeing me, her whole body on full alert, checking me out. I accidentally found her nest. I thought her nest was one abandoned by the robin who has nested across from my apartment. Nope. She has 3 eggs!

Serene Robins

My newest neighbors, a pair of American Robins, have built three different versions of nests, and despite human traffic (the noise of lawnmowers, cars, partying college students who have just graduated), they have settled on an air conditioning unit directly across from my apartment window.

They have been very easy to photograph, letting me peek into their private world without interrupting their nesting process or frightening them away. The birds are lucky to have picked a place where our backyard faces Schmeekle Reserve: http://www.uwsp.edu/cnr-ap/schmeeckle/Pages/home.aspx

The nearby University of Wisconsin — Stevens Point campus has an excellent Natural Resources department and the area students and community love our wildlife!

As of May 25th, 2014 the Robins, whom I identify as Serene (female) and Serenade (male), have two eggs in the finally finished nest.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Cornell Lab of Ornithology