Change Species:

American Robin (Turdus migratorius)


Photo © Michele Polimine

American Robin

Photo © Sharon Beals, from the collection of the California Academy of Sciences

American Robin Nest Detail

Photo © Graham Sorenson

American Robin Eggs

Photo © Kristi Gould

American Robin Side View

Photo © Mike Conley

fs_robin

Photo © Laura Meyers

Adult male

Photo © Ashley Bradford | Macaulay Library

Adult

Photo © Joshua Covill | Macaulay Library

Female/immature

Photo © Ryan Schain | Macaulay Library

Female/immature

Photo © Shawn Loewen | Macaulay Library

Adult male

Photo © Glenn Perricone | Macaulay Library

Female/immature

Photo © Dave Spier | Macaulay Library

Juvenile

Photo © Greg Gillson | Macaulay Library

Adult male

Photo © Zach Millen | Macaulay Library

Adult male

Photo © Andrew Spencer | Macaulay Library

Adult male

Photo © Matthew Garvin | Macaulay Library

Song and calls

© Wil Hershberger | Macaulay Library

Song

© Wil Hershberger | Macaulay Library

Calls

© Randolph Little | Macaulay Library

Calls

© Michael Andersen | Macaulay Library

Calls

© Michael Andersen

Song (San Lucas)

© Nicholas T. Roth

When To Look

Source: Birds of North America Online

Where To Find It

Habitats

forest

open woodland

shrub

town

Substrates

ground

Live Tree Branch

Vine or Tangle

In/On Building

What You'll Find

Nest Type

cup

Chick

Altricial

Clutch Size

3
5

Nest Height

25 ft
10 ft

Nesting Statistics

Incubation Period

12-14
days

Brooding Period

13
days

Useful Hints

  • The robin’s nest is an open cup of grass and twigs held together with a thick layer of mud and lined with fine dry grass.
  • Females build the nest from the inside, pressing dead grass and twigs around them into a cup shape using the wrist of one wing.
  • Because the robin forages largely on lawns, it is vulnerable to pesticide poisoning and can be an indicator of chemical pollution.