Common Nesting Birds

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Bewick’s Wren (Thryomanes bewickii)


Photo © J. Pavesi

Bewick's Wren nest

Photo © René Corado

Bewick's Wren eggs

Photo © René Corado

Bewick's Wren

Photo © Sharon Beals, from the collection of the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology

Photo © DigiBirdTrek CA | Macaulay Library

Photo © Greg Gillson | Macaulay Library

Photo © Christine Jacobs | Macaulay Library

Photo © Marlene Cashen | Macaulay Library

Photo © Brian Sullivan | Macaulay Library

Photo © Lew Johnson | Macaulay Library

Song and calls (bewickii)

© Arthur A. Allen | Macaulay Library

Song (spilurus Group)

© Thomas G. Sander | Macaulay Library

Calls (spilurus Group)

© Geoffrey A. Keller | Macaulay Library

Calls (bewickii)

© Arthur A. Allen | Macaulay Library

Calls (mexicanus Group)

© Geoffrey A. Keller | Macaulay Library

Calls (mexicanus Group)

© Geoffrey A. Keller | Macaulay Library

Calls (mexicanus Group)

© Ted Parker | Macaulay Library

Calls (mexicanus Group)

© Virginia Huber | Macaulay Library

When To Look

Source: Birds of North America Online

Where To Find It

Habitats

desert

open woodland

shrub

Substrates

Nestbox or Birdhouse

In/On Building

Live Tree Cavity

Dead Tree Cavity

What You'll Find

Nest Type

cavity

Chick

Altricial

Clutch Size

3
5
7
8

Nest Height

30 ft
0.5 ft

Nesting Statistics

Incubation Period

14-16
days

Brooding Period

14-16
days

Useful Hints

  • At the sound of approaching humans, a female Bewick’s Wren incubating eggs usually flushes quietly from her nest cavity, but remains nearby and scolds. Some females, however, sit tightly on their eggs even when disturbed.
  • The open cup may be lined with feathers, wool, hair, or plant down, with a final inner lining of snakeskin.
  • Bewick’s Wrens usually build their nests in cavities or on ledges within 30 feet of the ground. Males often begin the process, with the female contributing equally by the end.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Cornell Lab of Ornithology